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"Summer brings obstacles for managing medication" by Richard S. Winer, M.D.
Episode #4
ADHD in a new year and new semester [Listen Now]
Dr. Rick Winer

Welcome to the website of North Fulton Psychiatric Care, P.C.

There are many reasons why physicians choose psychiatry. For me, the greatest appeal of the field has always been the opportunity to treat the entire person, not simply a particular part of the body. Meeting with, interviewing and talking with people is the foundation of any successful treatment, listening to what has led to their visit to the office.

While there have been tremendous strides in the medication now available to treat many psychiatric conditions, and I firmly believe in considering those medications when indicated, no treatment can fully replace talking to a therapist. Many patients find that when medication has helped stabilize their condition, they benefit even more from talk therapy.

In 29 years of practicing medicine in Georgia, I have prescribed nearly every medication indicated for conditions such as ADHD, depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety. With emerging technologies in pharmacotherapy, I feel it is extremely important to keep up with the newest medications in order to know all available treatment options and which may be most helpful for each patient.

It is equally important to consider the biopsychosocial model that greatly influences our emotional state. The biological component includes genetics, medical conditions with psychiatric aspects and medication reactions. Each person has his or her own psychological make-up that comprises the middle part of the model. Within the social sphere, there are stresses, traumatic events and situations that can create difficulties for anyone. Whether in adults or children, the greatest challenge for many people is knowing when these difficulties necessitate therapy and then seeking out the assistance they need.

I treat both adults and children in my practice. Adults are evaluated and treated for a variety of conditions—frequently a combination of conditions—including ADHD, depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders and bipolar disorders among others.

Young children, adolescents and college students are among the young people I have seen in the practice. Much of my work with young people revolves around the evaluation and treatment of ADHD and other conditions often found with ADHD.

To some, I might seem old-fashioned in my approach. I treat every patient's situation as unique. I think of myself as relatively conservative with respect to medications. I do not hesitate to recommend medication when it appears to be an appropriate treatment choice. However, not every patient needs medications, and I do not mind saying so when that seems appropriate.

I look forward to and appreciate the opportunity to meet with you. I will do everything I can to help you.

Richard S. Winer, M.D.